Natural Immunity: 8 Plus Natural Antibiotics to Replace Toxic Drugs.


Christina Sarich
November 11, 2013

spices assortment1 263x164 Natural Immunity: 8+ Natural Antibiotics to Replace the Pharmaceuticals for Good
The overuse of antibiotics has become a modern-day epidemic. These drugs have depleted our natural immunity by killing the good bacteria in our guts and also creating super-bugs that have become resistant to almost any form of prescribed drug around. Instead of making yourself weaker, and depleting your body’s natural ability to cure itself from any number of ailments, try utilizing natural foods and herbs to ditch the Big Pharma meds for good.

Here are 8+ foods which harness natural antibiotic properties:

1. Astragalus – An adaptogen, meaning it is an overall tonic for the body, astragalus has been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicinal practices to boost the immune system and counteract physical, mental, and emotional stress. Research has shown that it can be very effective at treating colds, protecting the liver, and keeping viruses at bay.

2. Onions – This great tasting food is both antibacterial and antiseptic. If a person were to suck on a raw onion, it is thought that the healing components of the food could suck the disease right out of them. You can even place some cut up onions in your kitchen to protect against unwanted bacteria to keep your whole house healthy.  When mixed with lime juice and a few other natural constituents, onions were even shown to eradicate antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli. Check out some other health benefits of onions here.

3. Cabbage – One of the cruciferous vegetables, cabbage has anti-microbial properties which can kill all kinds of diseases naturally. The antibiotic properties of cabbage are increased once it has been fermented as well. So eat your sauerkraut, or better yet, make your own.

4. Honey – Although honey has always been used to fight off infection, scientists have just recently identified one secret ingredient in honey that makes it a natural antibiotic because it kills unwanted bacteria. It’s a protein called defensin-1 which bees add to honey when they make it. It does what it sounds like too – makes your immune system a full defense against disease.

5. Fermented Vegetables – Reseeding your gut with good microbes, which can be found in just about all fermented vegetables, can keep your immune system on full-tilt. If you haven’t already heard, your gut health accounts for about 80% of your overall immunity to disease, so putting the good bacteria back in is essential.

6. Cinnamon – Sometimes called a ‘lethal’ natural antibiotic, cinnamon has been used medicinally for ages. Pure, real Ceylon cinnamon can even stop E.Coli in its tracks, a stubborn bacteria that causes many diseases. Experts at Kansas City State University found that not only does cinnamon act as a natural antibiotic, it is so full of antioxidants that it helps to boost the immune system in numerous ways.

7. Sage – This herb is a wonderful natural solution for upper respiratory system issues. It can also help with stomach ailments, reduce fever naturally, and help with the common cold and flu.

8. Thyme – Both thyme leaf and thyme oil are very effective natural antibiotics. A compound in thyme oil called thymol is also anti-microbial, anti-fungal and anti-protozoal properties.

There are other natural antibiotics out there too. They include:

  • Rosemary
  • Coriander
  • Dill, mustard seed
  • Anise
  • Basil
  • Lemon balm
  • Wild Indigo
  • Echinacea
  • Olive leaf
  • Turmeric
  • Pau D’ Arco
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Colloidal silver
  • Grapefruit seed extract
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Oregano oil

With such a large offering from mother nature to treat ailments naturally, with all of their vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to boot, why would we ever choose pharmaceuticals? These natural remedies also cost pennies per day to either grow or purchase and take as preventative medicine.

Rev. Dragon’s Eye:

Time to seriously contemplate what we are going to do with the coming “End of The Age of Antibiotics”. As Hippocrates once stated:
Let Thy Food Be Thy Medicine,
And Thy Medicine Be Thy Food.
Over 98% of all health problems, illnesses, and “dis-eases” are DIETARY-RELATED. This is just plain commonsense!

– Rev. Dragon’s Eye,
Founder and Chief-Elder of the Temple,
TEMPLE OF THE ANCIENT DRAGON

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The Making of Essiac.


Every herbal formula has its own synergy and therefore creates a specific effect.  Rene Caisse spent her life refining the formula with her hands-on research.  No one else has done such extensive research on Essiac tea.  The formula below was the final formula that she settled on after more than fifty years of experimentation and research with real cancer patients.  Rene Caisse stated:  “If it works, don’t change it.”   [ESSIAC ESSENTIALS, p. 84]

“Now, like Grandma Moses, I paint pictures.  Many, many oil paintings, trying to forget that which I know I can never forget–that I know a cure for cancer, and that I can never give it to the world, and must each day see the misery of the patients.”  [Rene Caisse quote from I Was Canada’s Cancer Nurse.  The painting on the right was painted by Rene Caisse.  CLICK HERE to view more of Rene’s paintings.]

THE FORMULA

The following formula and recipe for Essiac (in italics) is a word-for-word transcription of the Essiac formula from the sworn affidavit which Mary McPherson filed with the Town of Bracebridge.  CLICK HERE to view a certified true copy of Mary McPherson’s two-page affidavit.  The formula below is also the one which Dr. Gary Glum released to the public in 1988 when he published CALLING OF AN ANGEL:  ESSIAC, NATURE’S CURE FOR CANCER

 

Essiac

6 ½ cups of burdock root (cut)   (upper left)

1 pound of sheep sorrel herb   powdered  (upper right)

1/4 pound of slippery elm bark   powdered  (lower left)

1 ounce of Turkish rhubarb root    powdered  (lower right)

 

Mix these ingredients thoroughly and store in glass jar in dark dry cupboard.

Take a measuring cup, use 1 ounce of herb mixture to 32 ounces of water depending on the amount you want to make.

I use 1 cup of mixture to 8 x 32 = 256 ounces of water.  Boil hard for 10 minutes (covered) then turn off heat but leave sitting on warm plate over night (covered).

In the morning heat steaming hot and let settle a few minutes, then strain through fine strainer into hot sterilized bottles and sit to cool.  Store in dark cool cupboard.  Must be refrigerated when opened.  When near the last when its thick pour in a large jar and sit in frig overnight then pour off all you [can] without sediment.

This recipe must be followed exactly as written.

I use a granite preserving kettle (10 – 12 qts), 8 ounce measuring cup, small funnel and fine strainer to fill bottles.

HOW TO MAKE ESSIAC TEA VIDEO:  CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video on How to Make Essiac Tea in your own home.

 

ADDITIONAL TIPS & INFORMATION

The preparation of Essiac is as important as the formula itself.  Essiac is a decoction, not an infusion.  An infusion is what people make when they put a tea bag in a cup of hot water.  Generally speaking, an infusion tends to extract vitamins and volatile oils from leaves and flowers.  A decoction is used to extract minerals, bitter components, etc. from hard materials such as roots, bark or seeds by boiling for a few minutes and then allowing the herbs to steep for several hours.  Entrepreneurs often sell Essiac imitations in tincture form (herbs in alcohol) or in gelatin capsules; neither form is Essiac because Essiac is a tea and, more specifically, a decoction that must be made in a certain way in order to achieve the kind of results that Nurse Caisse was demonstrating. 

 

People often substitute stainless steel for an enameled pot and lid.  The main concern is not to use an aluminum pot.  Also, be sure not to use unfiltered, chlorinated water.  The formula above can be reduced to 1/2 cup of herb mix to one gallon of water.   [Optional:  Dr. Glum suggests adding 2 or 3 cups of extra water to replace water lost through evaporation during boiling.  Also, the dry herbs will absorb water as well.]   After boiling for ten minutes, let the tea steep about 12 hours.  Then heat up tea to steaming, but not boiling.  (Do not boil twice.)  The remaining pulp can be used for healing poultices. 

Don’t use cheese cloth to strain Essiac.  Likewise, do not use a kitchen sieve that has a very fine mesh as this may filter out the slippery elm.  Slippery elm gives the tea a slight viscous consistency when poured.  If you do not notice this “slippery” consistency after refrigerating your tea, you may be using a sieve that is too fine.  Don’t worry about herb particles in your Essiac; they will settle to the bottom of the jars.  Some people drink the Essiac dregs (particles that settle on the bottom), others don’t.  Some people give the Essiac dregs to their pets or farm animals as a health food.  Many people have reported the same or similar health benefits with their pets that humans are reporting.  The dregs can also be used topically as a poultice.

 

It is best to refrigerate the Essiac tea as soon as it has cooled.  Discard the tea if mold appears on the surface or if the tea does not taste right.  CLICK HERE to learn about dosage.  

 

Make sure that the sheep sorrel you use is the small, wild variety of sheep sorrel and not a substitute like yellow dock or garden (French) sorrel.  Imported turkey rhubarb root could be fumigated or irradiated.  Many Essiac merchants are unaware of the quality of their herbs.  The best way to insure that you’re getting true Essiac is to grow the herbs yourself.  This puts you in control of product quality and takes out the commercialism.  Burdock root is harvested in the fall of the first year.  Slippery elm bark is wildcrafted or organically-grown and is easy to buy. Turkey Rhubarb is the only herb in Essiac that cannot be wildcrafted in the US.  The Chinese use six year old turkey rhubarb roots for maximum potency. 

 

*Quotes about Turkey rhubarb are from A MODERN HERBAL, first published by Jonathan Cape, 1931

The Essiac tea in the snow on a foggy January morning (picture above left) was made using the Essiac formula given above.  Compare the tea color in this picture to the tea that Rene Caisse herself holds in her hand in this YouTube video:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k_nW-b-XmQ.

“We all have the right to benefit from Essiac because no one can stop us making it, no one can stop us taking it and no one can stop us deciding how and when we’re going to do it.”  [THE ESSIAC BOOK by Mali Klein, 2006] 

( Originally posted on: http://www.healthfreedom.info/Cancer%20Essiac.htm )

Unfortunately,

The graphics and images did not transfer to this posted copy, but you can go to the original URL to see the original article in full.

– Rev. Dragon’s Eye,
Temple of The Ancient Dragons

Ancient Egyptian Scrolls Document Natural Herbs and Holistic Medicine that Saved Lives and Cured Disease


Ooooh! This I very much like!
“Modern medicine (allopathy)”, eat your diseased, chemically-tainted, mis-educated hearts out!

Herbs played a huge role in Egyptian medicine. Proof comes from burial sites, tombs and underground temples where archeologists have found extensive sets of medical documents and scrolls, including the Ebers Papyrus, the Edwin Smith Papyrus, the Hearst Papyrus, and the London Medical Papyrus, which contained the earliest documented awareness of tumors. The most famous plant – medicine “encyclopedia” is the Ebers Papyrus, a 110 page scroll which rolls out to be about 20 meters long.

Egyptians consumed raw garlic and onions for endurance and to heal asthma and bronchial-pulmonary issues. Many of their herbs were steeped in wine and used as oral medicine. These were natural herbs, untainted by pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, or fluoridated water. The Egyptians documented use of myrrh, frankincense, fennel, cassia, thyme, juniper, and even aloe. Fresh garlic cloves were peeled, mashed and macerated in a mixture of vinegar and water and used as a rinse…

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Natural Remedies for Colds and Coughs.


By The Editors of Rodale News
Mon, Dec 23, 2013

sick woman

Kitchen Cures for Winter Misery

Coughs and colds can leave you feeling miserable—and so can the over-the-counter drugs being peddled to treat them. So the next time a bad cold or cough hits, put down the blister packs and bottles of colorful pills, and head to your kitchen instead. Healing foods full of anti-inflammatory compounds and natural antiviral compounds can work wonders without the side effects of drowsiness, jitteriness, and all-over funkiness.

We dug into Rodale’s library of books on natural remedies and came up with some of the easiest ways to keep a cold or cough from laying you up for days on end.

Alternative Cold Remedies That Work

Honey

The World Health Organization has cited honey as a potential remedy for colds because it coats the throat and relieves irritation (which is what usually triggers a cough). It also has antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, which help fight infections from viruses, bacteria, and fungi. (Source: The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods)

Related: 12 Fun Ways to Prevent Colds…Organically!

Lemon

Christopher Hobbs, a fourth-generation California herbalist and author of several books on herbal medicine, suggests a formula that is worth taking two or three times a day for a cough. Add 2 teaspoons of organic lemon rind, 1 teaspoon of sage, and ½ teaspoon of thyme to boiling water and steep for 15 minutes. Then add the juice of half a lemon and 1 tablespoon of honey. Remember to use organic lemon rind because the pesticides used on citrus fruits are extremely hard to wash off. (Source: The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods)

13 natural cold remedies: What works and what doesn’t

Ginger Tea

Ginger acts as a potent natural anti-inflammatory herbal agent. Most people use ginger tea as a way to soothe their painful throats, although fresh ginger from the produce section of your local supermarket is also good. (Source: The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies)

Black Pepper and Honey

Place 1 teaspoon of McCormick Black Pepper in a teacup, fill with boiling water, cover with a saucer, and let steep for 15 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons of SueBee Honey, and drink the peppery tea. The black pepper stimulates circulation and doubles as a decongestant. The mildly antibiotic honey soothes the throat and relieves coughing. Do not feed honey to infants younger than 1 year old.  (Source: Joey Green’s Magic Health Remedies: 1,363 Quick-and-Easy Cures Using Everyday Brand-Name Products)

Related: Herbs That Work—and Are Safe to Use—During Pregnancy

Raw or Lightly Cooked Garlic

It’s rich in chemical compounds that help inhibit cough-causing viruses in the respiratory tract, says pediatrician Stuart Ditchek, MD. Garlic is a wonderful natural antibiotic that can assist in fighting off colds and common upper respiratory infections. “Extracts of aged garlic can be used as well,” he says. Try to eat two to four garlic cloves daily, Dr. Ditchek says. Or use garlic supplements, following the directions on the label. But avoid garlic supplements for 7 to 10 days prior to any surgery. Using these supplements can increase the risk of bleeding, especially when used for long periods of time, he says. (Source: The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies)

Horseradish

If you can bear the heat, eat horseradish or other hot foods such as hot mustard or wasabi several time a day. It will liquefy phlegm and help to relieve a cough. (Source: The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods)

Related: 25 Foods That Fight Cold & Flu

Sage

Sage is one of the very best sore throat and cough remedies. The leaves can be chewed and the juice swallowed to soothe a sore throat; swallowing the healing and anesthetic juice numbs the unpleasant soreness and helps speed healing. Sage-lemon tea is an excellent drink for treating colds and flu, especially if you add some thyme for extra antibacterial action. (Source: Grow It, Heal It: Natural and Effective Herbal Remedies from Your Garden or Windowsill)

Grapefruit Tea

In the early stages of a cold, try this recipe from Brian Berman, MD: Place a whole unpeeled grapefruit, sectioned into four pieces, in a pot and cover with water; heat to just under a boil. Stir and add 1 tablespoon of honey, then drink the liquid as you would a tea. “The simmering releases immune boosters from the grapefruit into the water—vitamin C and flavonoids hidden between the rind and the fruit,” he says. “The concoction packs more punch than store-bought grapefruit juice, plus the warmth eases a sore throat. (Source: The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies)

Related: 5 Recipes Full of Healthy Vitamin C

Honey, Olive Oil, and Lemon Juice

To make homemade cough syrup, mix 1 cup of SueBee Honey, ½ cup of Star Olive Oil, and 4 tablespoons of ReaLemon lemon juice in a saucepan and warm over low heat for 5 minutes. Stir vigorously for several minutes until the mixture attains the consistency of syrup. To relieve a cough, take 1 teaspoon of the formula every 2 hours. Store in an airtight container. Do not feed honey to infants younger than 1 year old. (Source: Joey Green’s Magic Health Remedies: 1,363 Quick-and-Easy Cures Using Everyday Brand-Name Products)

Chicken Soup

Eating chicken soup helps you stay hydrated, improves your immunity, provides antioxidants that your body needs to help fight the virus, helps clear mucus from your system, and reduces inflammation. In a study by researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, chicken soup reduced the movement of the neutrophils in blood, which they think lowers activity that causes inflammation and cold symptoms in the respiratory tract. (Source: The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods)

Related: Kitchen Comfort for Cold and Flu Sufferers

Salt and Baking Soda

To alleviate a cough, make a saline nose wash to rinse mucus from your nasal passages. Purify 8 ounces of water by boiling for 3 minutes, let cool to room temperature, and dissolve ¼ teaspoon of Morton Salt and ¼ teaspoon of Arm & Hammer baking soda in the purified water. Use a bulb syringe or neti pot to rinse the inside of your nose. Postnasal drip frequently causes or worsens coughs, and washing out the mucus that would otherwise drip down your throat relieves the cough. (Source: Joey Green’s Magic Health Remedies: 1,363 Quick-and-Easy Cures Using Everyday Brand-Name Products)

Zinc

Sucking on zinc lozenges can cut colds short—from an average of eight days to an average of four, report researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. Study subjects sucked on four to eight lozenges a day, each containing 13.3 milligrams of zinc. Zinc can also dramatically reduce symptoms such as a dry, irritated throat, says Elson Haas, MD. “It doesn’t work for everyone, but when it works, it works.” (Source: The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies)

A Tissue

For productive coughs, blowing your nose frequently helps eliminate mucus before it has the chance to stimulate the cough reflex, says Dr. Ditchek. “Postnasal drip is by far the most common cause of hacking coughs in young children,” he says. And these coughs worsen when you lie flat. Gravity helps, too, so try elevating the head of the bed. (Source: The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies)

Sources:

( “Re-blogged” from Yahoo Health News. )