The “Brain As A Computer”- Why Modern Psychiatry Has It All Wrong! – Part II


How Our Present Reality may be defined or at least shaped by Our Past.

Many of our personal “isms” that we may express or act upon today, are often supported or induced by memories of our past.

Some of the things we may dislike, or altogether avoid, that we are likely to encounter later in our lives, usually come from some past experiences in them. These kinds of experiences tend to be unfavorable or even very tragic ones. This commonplace with folks who have suffered some form of personal trauma due to experiencing an event that may have traumatized them to the point of eliciting nightmares as an after-effect. Some of the more common cases arising from folks who have grown up in especially violent environments, 1) were victims of a violent or non-violent but traumatizing crime committed by another, 2) wartime soldiers’ and veterans’ experiences on the battlefields (in what used to be called “shell-shock” in the old times, and now is called “Post Traumatic Stress Disorder” [PTSD]), 3) those who experienced abuse in childhood years at home, 4) social problems with others – especially from being bullied by others, 5) and various other “forgotten”, but unresolved experiences. There is a very long list of the types of past events and experiences that may affect how one sees the world, and interacts with it, today.

The Nature of Some of our Phobias:

Many personal phobias may arise from something, or a multiple of things, that have been experienced in the past. Such memories of those events may be foggy at best, and not so visible in the here and now, but their effects can still be felt, although subtly. A common coping mechanism to “get past” a particular event is often by denying it. Such a denial of its occurrence does not necessarily “make it go away”, nor may it lend itself to a simple healing solution. Such an experience can easily lead to life-long effects, and even interfere with the individual’s potential abilities at interacting with society, if not dealt with in a timely manner and in a way that opens the doors to some workable, effective solutions. Most of these phobias will have a strong emotional element to them, relating directly to the emotional response of the experience which may have resulted in them.

Some cases of particular phobias, and/or other specific “nervous ticks” may be expressed, even without a direct recollection of the past experience that triggered them. Some adverse experiences may even have some folks become more socially withdrawn, as they become distrustful of others around them. This is one major area where modern psychiatry has failed miserably in its pursuits for “treatments”, especially when utilizing such methods as aversion-therapy, prescribed medications (petro-chemical drugs), and other “prosthetic bandage” methods which do very little to address the root causes and problems. Such treatment options are usually graded on how much profit can result from the treatment plans. Medicating such patients is especially inefficient, usually unhelpful, but profitable to the doctors AND the manufacturers of those products, even at the expense of the patient – and possibly society, later.

The Unseen Scars.

Many of the so-called “psychological” problems that result from unfortunate past experiences, are often referred to as the “Unseen Scars”, where such injuries were not so physically evident, but the emotional pain remains, hidden from public view. Such emotional “scars” can remain for many years, up until the last of a being’s life. Medications, aversion therapies, and especially “electroshock therapy” (which WAS outlawed years ago, but seems to be reintroduced as a “viable treatment” in recent years) DO NOT and HAVE NOT BEEN EVIDENCED TO resolve nor even efficiently “treat” emotional scars, nor emotionally-rooted behaviors and behavioral problems. This because they do absolutely NOTHING to address the root causes, but simply mask over the symptomatic behaviors with a prosthetic effect! Yet, the immense pressure from the American Medical Association, American Psychological Association, National Institutes of Mental Health, and the many different organizations (to include a few NGO’s) is what helps to keep these unworkable, ineffective treatment options in place as the “standards of medical treatment”.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, volume 5 (DSM-V) and all previous editions came out as the “bible of human psychology”, and the favorite “go-to” book for psychologists and psychiatrists. Every “diagnosis” is attributed to “mental conditions” and “abnormalities” that are identifiable by behavioral characteristics, rather than any reproducible pathology or lab results. What’s even more disheartening: Most of the “syndromes” and conditions are more rooted in emotional scars from past traumatic events and/or other current, ongoing events. As any commonsense-minded individual could find, when one does not address the root problems, but merely masks them with some form of “treatment” or therapy that deals only with the behavioral symptoms, these are problems that are very likely to resurface! Chemical drugs are often only able to be “safely” taken for so long, before they build up to toxic levels in the body, and/or the body becomes resistant to them over time (through tolerance). Most of these drugs ARE toxic to the normal-functioning body. The body will try to do what it does best: Detoxify, and then eliminate these substances from the body altogether. Some of these medical drugs may, themselves, leave behind certain scars, be they physical and/or “psychological” as well.

Where the Failures of the Current Treatment Orthodoxy fail.

What many folks are not asking about, because they may not be seeing the real hidden-in-plain-view problem: “If our psychological medicine is supposedly superior to competing methods and orthodoxies, then why do we see so many examples of where the treated (former, but life-long) patients fall into relapses?” I thought the business of medicine and healing, was about actually healing (and even curing) conditions so that the patients can go on to lead healthy, self-sufficient lives??? – And THERE is the rub, and a prime example, yet again, that today’s “medicine” is not about curing or healing anything. The average psychologist/psychiatrist would want you “mentally ill” and dependent upon their care and advice for life! This is guaranteed profits for the long haul.

Just as much as there are severe conflicts of interest in physical medicine and where it is practiced, so the same can easily be said of “mental health” programs and their clinics. Many individuals who still carry around emotional scars, deeply buried within, are taught to rely on the various drugs and other treatment regimens as their relief. Yet, many still suffer the silence of their own memories, the pains of past experiences they have never been taught to work through and release from. To them, life does not seem to be the way it “should be”. To some, life has become more and more of a history of disappointments and many insurmountable hurdles. The current orthodoxy for treatment options is failing them worst of all.

So what kinds of alternative options are there available to those who are still dealing with “past baggage” and emotional traumas in their lives? That is a question I will do my best to answer in a later post in this series. What needs to be remembered here is: With the appearance of increased acts of spontaneous violence and mass-murders, and the fact that an unworkable system of treatments and therapies seems to always be championed as “The Answer” to everyone’s problems, is it any wonder why some folks would start to see that this treatment orthodoxy is NOT WORKING AS PROMISED?!? The MORE psychological intervention that the state invests in, the MORE we are seeing results that do little to justify the continued orthodoxy for treatment, as we have it now!

IN THE NEXT ARTICLE: “Brain As A Computer”- Why Modern Psychiatry Has It All Wrong! – Part III

I want to explore a little bit of the surfacing of repressed memories, and some of the acts that often result from reliving those memories. I would like to relate some of my personal experiences with folks whom I have known for a number of years. Some of them drink. Some of them, quite a bit. There is fertile discussion on the subject of whether alcohol “makes” anyone do anything they normally would not say or do when they are perfectly sober. I seek to dispel this meme from plain examples as observed, and understood.

Until then,

– “Be Blessed, Always.”

Rev. Dragon’s Eye,
Founder and Chief-Elder Dragon of the Temple,
TEMPLE OF THE ANCIENT DRAGONS

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “The “Brain As A Computer”- Why Modern Psychiatry Has It All Wrong! – Part II

  1. You raised some extremely relevant issues there. Yes, mental health care is a thorny issue. Diagnostic labelling can present us with uncomfortable truths that exsist in the power that a state wields over the minds and bodies of people. In deciding what conforms to a normative trend, the state essentially creates an arbitary other which in many cases becomes a political or economic expedient and often has little or nothing to do with genuine healing. The French philosopher Focult would be a useful resource for understanding the inherent power relations that can arise from the language of diagnostic labelling. Many thanks for a really thought-provoking post.

    Liked by 1 person

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